Sprint 19 Review – Day to Day

Sprint Review

  • May 5th through May 11th, 2017
  • Weight: 341.9 lbs. (-2.5 (sprint) / -2.5 (release) / -17.5 (total))

Retrospective

So, down 2.5. There have been some personal issues (family health), which would normally have thrown me off my game, but I managed to avoid them.

I did this by breaking my longer sprint into… days. In a mantra not unlike the followers of a 12-step program, on my hard days I just had to tell myself – I have to move 1000 calories today. No diet sodas… today. And it worked. The exception was on Sunday, Mother’s Day, as I was on the road all day, and only did 1000 calories of moving.

There were a few occasions when being home to eat before 8 was impossible, but this is imperfect – I had to make a choice between less-healthy food or eating slightly after 8. I chose to eat a little later.

This also changed my workout schedule and regimen, so I walked more the past week. Changing this has me with more sore muscles, especially in my lower legs

So basically I expected a little slower, and am pleased at 2.5 lost.

Changes

None – I think I’m going to slow down changes to each release, so I have time to see how changes affect progress, unless something big happens.

Stories

User Stories: As someone trying to lose weight as part of a healthy lifestyle transformation

  1. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to be at a healthy weight, so…
    1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
    2. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).
  2. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to be fit, so…
    1. I want to burn an extra 1,200 calories each weekend day, as measured by the watch’s “Move” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise and pushing myself more on weekends. 
    2. I want to burn an extra 1,000 calories each weekday, as measured by the watch’s “Move” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
    1. I book at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, as measured by my watch’s “Exercise” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise.
  3. Epic – as part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to avoid unneeded chemicals, especially in my drinks, so…
    1. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
    2. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license.
  4. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to keep myself rested and learn to handle stress, so…
    1. I get to bed in time to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest

Release Seven – Organizing my Effort

Welcome to Release Seven

Release Six is in the books. You can read the Sprint reports in the links below. The Release’s target weight loss was 10 pounds, and the loss over four sprints was 15 pounds!

As mentioned in Release Two – The Scope of the Problem, weight is a trailing indicator of my progress in this, but it shows some good stuff…

Weight Loss Over Release Six

What this shows me is a steady and gradual loss up until a week ago, and then a sudden loss of six pounds. Did I really lose six pounds in a week? The numbers show that, but weight is a tricky thing. Before my seven-mile hike last Sunday my weight was 350.4, but it was about four pounds less right afterwards. Did I “lose weight?” According to the scale, yes. But after I re-hydrated myself, my weight went back up – it was all water.

It’s frustrating.

So, regardless of what the scale shows at any particular time of day, my weight first thing on Saturday morning is what I use to determine my progress. It’s imperfect, but I’m imperfect and this is an imperfect effort.

Third Time’s a Charm

This is really the third iteration in my effort to become healthy…

First Iteration

In the mid-2000s, I was very unhealthy, weighing in at close to 400 lbs. I wore size 60 pants, 5XL shirts, and was just in horrible shape. I had tried many approaches to losing weight, and in 2008 I just started walking, then running.

As I mentioned in Release Two – The Scope of the Problem, I lost weight, mainly because I was fixated on walking and then running as a way to lose weight. My internal goal wasn’t to lose weight, it was to run marathons. When that was accomplished, the iteration was over. I just didn’t get slapped with that fat until I’d gained weight and put on more weight, which led to my injuries.

If I were to write stories for this iteration, there would have been one…

Story – As someone who wants to run marathons, I run.

Second Iteration

The second iteration began in 2017, with Release One – On Your Mark.

For this iteration, I had a much better basis to work, and I believe this would have been successful if not for the disasters of my heart issues (outlined in Release Four – Coronary Bypass Edition).

Losing The Bubble – An Uncontrolled Descent

There’s a navigation term – “Losing the bubble.” Losing the bubble is a navigation term from the days when navigation was done with devices that used a bubble, like that in a level, to determine a craft’s heading. When you lose the bubble you lose your bearings or attitude and can’t figure out how to find your path.

After the bypass and my father’s passing, I lost the bubble. I tried a “fake it till you make it” approach in Release Five – Three Months Later, but my heart wasn’t in it (pun intended).

If you look at my weight for this period, you will see the exact point where I lost the bubble – I couldn’t find the way to continue. I headed down, and my weight headed back up.


Losing the Bubble

It took me 21 months to find the bubble again.

I’ve thought about erasing Releases Four and Five, as they were written as I tried to find the bubble and are personal and a little embarrassing, but I made a promise to myself to be completely transparent. They’re still in place, and will remain so.

Third Iteration

This is now. Spiritually, this iteration is picking up where Release Three – Dealing With Change ended. It’s NOT that June/July of 2018 didn’t happen, but I’ve found the bubble again. I started this Release when I did because it was almost exactly two years from the start of the Second Iteration, and I needed to get back on the path.

A Change to Organization

If you’ve been following my writing, You’ll notice I’ve been organizing my weight loss in what I called “Epics,” each covering about 10 pounds of weight loss. I used the concept of User Stories to outline what I’d be doing in any sprint.

It occurred to me that this is wrong. In Agile, Epics are mega-stories, large backlog items that are themselves decomposed to stories at the “last responsible moment.” My usage of the metaphor “Epic” is inaccurate.

The principles behind the Agile Manifesto speak to the delivery of valuable software. This software is delivered in units called Releases. While I’m not delivering software, I am delivering value – an agile lifestyle transformation.

And so, Epics become Releases. I’ve changed the past Epics to Releases. , and so you may not have noticed, but this is just noted in favor of transparency.

It’s Epic!

As I said, an Epic is a mega-story, usually used to organize stories, and so I’ll use them to organize stories.

In Release Two – The Scope of the Problem, I identified a goal – As a healthy person, I live a healthy lifestyle. If I define healthy strictly in terms of weight, fine, but there’s more to healthy than that.

I can obviously be of a healthy weight. Currently, at my height that’s about 190 pounds, which I don’t think I’ve been at since high school.

Weight isn’t the only aspect of a healthy lifestyle, though – thin alone does not equate to healthy. I can also be physically healthy, in terms of exercise, body composition, and the capacity of my body to do work.

I like to consume fluids – I’ve never had a problem with the rule of thumb to drink 64 ounces of water a day. In fact, I drink fluids all the time. Up until recently, this has included diet sodas and alcohol. Neither of these provide my body with value (though I do enjoy a drink with friends).

Finally (for now) there is the concept of positively handling stress and being restful – I would strongly argue that my inability to handle stress led to the end of Iteration Two.

Now that I see things this way, there are more that I’ll be adding.

So let me put these in place..

  1. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to be at a healthy weight, so…
    1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
    2. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).
  2. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to be fit, so…
    1. I want to burn an extra 1,200 calories each weekend day, as measured by the watch’s “Move” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise and pushing myself more on weekends.
    2. I want to burn an extra 1,000 calories each weekday, as measured by the watch’s “Move” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
    3. I book at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, as measured by my watch’s “Exercise” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise.
  3. Epic – as part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to avoid unneeded chemicals, especially in my drinks, so…
    1. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
    2. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license.
  4. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to keep myself rested and learn to handle stress, so…
    1. I get to bed in time to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest.

So, this organization works for me. I like that this lets me group stories by Epic, and may lead to more Epics or stories. I’ll give it a try. If it fails, then it fails, but this isn’t perfect, is it?

A Recap of Release Six

At this point, my weight loss is 15 pounds, or 3.75 pounds per week. This is not unexpected, especially because I’ve been exercising more.

Release Six

And so Release Seven is set to begin. Off we go!

  • Date: 5/5/2019
  • Weight: 344.4 lbs. (-15 lbs. total)
  • Release Definition of Done: 334 lbs.

User Stories: As someone trying to lose weight as part of a healthy lifestyle transformation

  1. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to be at a healthy weight, so…
    1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
    2. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).
  2. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to be fit, so…
    1. I want to burn an extra 1,200 calories each weekend day, as measured by the watch’s “Move” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise and pushing myself more on weekends.
    2. I want to burn an extra 1,000 calories each weekday, as measured by the watch’s “Move” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
    3. I book at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, as measured by my watch’s “Exercise” activity, to ensure that I am getting exercise.
  3. Epic – as part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to avoid unneeded chemicals, especially in my drinks, so…
    1. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
    2. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license. NOTE: For this story, I’m giving myself an exception for Sunday – Cinco de Mayo, as it’s a social occasion with us hosting a party.
  4. Epic – As part of a healthy lifestyle, I need to keep myself rested and learn to handle stress, so…
    1. I get to bed in time to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest

Sprint Results

Release List

Sprint 18 Review – That’s the Way You Do It

Sprint Review

  • April 28th through May 4th, 2017
  • Weight: 344.4 lbs. (-6 (sprint) / -15 (release) / -15 (total))

Retrospective

Well, this was entirely awesome! Five pounds. It was an excellent week for stories, and an excellent week for weight loss. Additionally, I completed this Release!

Let’s talk stories. Nothing presented any trouble. But… my Move story – I rocked it with an average of 1,550 move calories per day. I completed over 30 minutes of exercise per day. I feel great! I’ve also started doing stretches ( from the appropriately named book Stretches.

  1. Stop consuming calories at 8PM – Good
  2. Burn over 1000 “Move calories” – Great – weekly average 1,550, up 120 from last week.
  3. 7 hours of sleep per night – Good – averaged 7.0 hours.
  4. No diet sodas – Good – No diet sodas, and my water consumption is way up.
  5. Don’t drink Alcohol at home – Good.
  6. No second helpings – Good.

Changes

Will be discussed in Release 7 post.

Speaking of which… On to Release 7!

Sprint 17 Review – Taking a Hike

Sprint Review

  • April 21st through April 27th, 2017
  • Weight: 350.4 lbs. (-2.6 (sprint) / -9 (release) / -9 (total))

Retrospective

Down another 2.6 pounds, 1 short of the epic goal. I was clearly over-confident about finishing the epic today but, hey, it’s an imperfect process.

So, this week was an excellent one as far as my stories go.

First off, not only did I complete all of my move stories (800 move calories), but with the exception of one day, I moved over 1,200 calories. That one day was only short by 8 calories.

Second off, each day I completed over 30 minutes of working out, either by walking/hiking, or riding a stationary bicycle.

Finally, I hiked both Saturday and Sunday. Sunday’s hike was just short of 7 miles. I weighed myself after this hike, and weighed in at 347.2, below the Epic target, but I started this weighing myself first thing in the morning, not after walking for close to three hours.

The first time I did this, though, I lost faster, but I wasn’t working out, so what’s the story? I wanted to find out, so I looked at some data. I have a body composition scale, and what it showed me is interesting. From the day I started 3 weeks ago until today, I’ve lost 9.5 pounds, but I’ve GAINED 13 pounds of muscle, and muscle weighs more than fat.

At this point, I’m going to slow down on pushing myself to go farther and longer, because… Well, because I push myself to injury (like the blisters I’m currently nursing. I’ll keep doing what I’m doing, but I’ll not be going for a longer hike next week. I’ll keep them less than 5, I think. I don’t want to hurt myself and have to stop.

  1. Stop consuming calories at 8PM – Good
  2. Burn over 800 “Move calories” – Great – weekly average 1,470, up 430 from last week. I’m going to increase this to 1,000 now.
  3. 7 hours of sleep per night – Good – averaged 7.0 hours.
  4. No diet sodas – Good – No diet sodas, and my water consumption is way up.
  5. Don’t drink Alcohol at home – Good.
  6. No second helpings – Good.

Changes

I’m going to up the Move story to 1,000.

Stories

As someone using agility to enable a healthy lifestyle transformation:

  1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
  2. I want to burn an extra 1,000 calories each day, as measured by the Watch’s “Move” measure, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
  3. I want to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest.
  4. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
  5. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license.
  6. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).

Sprint 16 Review – Step by Step

Sprint Review

  •  April 14th through April 20th, 2017
  • Weight: 353 lbs. (-6.9)

Retrospective

As expected, a little slower. As I write this, on the 21st, I’m confident this Epic will finish next week.

The highlight is this week were:

  1. My cardiologist, the excellent Dr. Nisha Bhatia, told me that my echocardiogram shows that my heart is working very well, and cleared me to ramp up the exercise portion of my healthy lifestyle. I/m getting a stress-test in a few weeks to give me an idea of how much I can tax the heart.
  2. With the news from Dr. Bhatia in mind, I went for a long hike on the trails of the town. In total, I went 3.4 miles in 1:10. It was a great walk.

If you’ll remember from my early blogging, I found out about my heart issue when I had tried to go for short walks and couldn’t make it because my heart was going all wonky. No more of that, and it’s a relief.

What’s even better is that my heart’s recovery from high pulse rates is improving, and it seems like the highs are less high. It just feels like my heart is getting used to me walking about.

Anyway, Here’s a quick rundown of my success this week:

  1. Stop consuming calories at 8PM – Good
  2. Burn over 800 “Move calories” – Great – weekly average 1,040. I’m going to change this story next epic.
  3. 7 hours of sleep per night – Good – averaged 6:52. It’s not that I’m not going to bed in time, but that I have trouble getting to sleep some nights.
  4. Good – No diet sodas, and my water consumption is way up.
  5. Don’t drink Alcohol at home – Good.
  6. No second helpings – Good.

Feedback

From Alex Brown…

Tom, you mention managing Muri through your process…do you prioritize your backlog? I found this very helpful because it gave me the space and structure to miss my lower priority stories on occasion while still keeping a sharp focus on the top priority stories. (that typically were the most impactful ones)

This also came in handy later for maintaining a target weight after I had achieved my goals because it created a “bubble story.” If I was trending toward the top of my target range I would add this story back to the backlog for the sprint, but if I was on the lower end of the range it came off. In my case, this story was “as a person looking to lose weight I will reduce the amount of carbohydrates and simple sugars I consume, since these are calorically-dense foods.” It was a very effective story for reducing weight, but as someone who loves bread and pasta it was one I didn’t want to overdo.

Keep up the great work.

I’ve been thinking about it, and might discuss it next Epic post.

Changes

None, but there will be a few next week.

Stories

As someone using agility to enable a healthy lifestyle transformation:

  1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
  2. I want to burn an extra 800 calories each day, as measured by the Watch’s “Move” measure, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
  3. I want to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest.
  4. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
  5. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license.
  6. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).

Sprint 15 Review – Starting Out Strong

Sprint Review

  •  April 7th through April 13th, 2017
  • Weight: 355 lbs. (-4.4 (sprint) / -4.4 (release) / -4.4 (total))

Retrospective

Well, that was good. It was easier than I’d anticipated to hop back into this plan. Not that I did everything perfectly (I didn’t) or that I met every story’s acceptance criteria (I didn’t), but (excuse the southern twang) I done good.

I’m also not naive enough to think that a loss of 4.9 pounds in a week is going to keep going. HA! It came on slow, it’s gonna leave slow.

What I have found, however, is an inkling of how to avoid derailing in the future; it comes down to mindset. At a few points during the week, I found myself facing a hard yes or no on something, and I lost track of Muri; unreasonableness. This is a classic derailer for me – I have a need to be perfect.

Here’s a quick rundown of my success this week:

  1. Stop consuming calories at 8PM – Good
  2. Burn over 800 “Move calories” – Great – weekly average 980. I’m considering upping the goal.
  3. 7 hours of sleep per night – OK – 4 out of 6 nights tracked. Not because I didn’t get to bed early, I didn’t fall asleep.
  4. OK – We had one diet soda left, which I drank, but I’ve been drinking a LOT of water.
  5. Don’t drink Alcohol at home – OK. For two nice meals Judi made I had a glass of wine. I’m considering a change to the story.
  6. No second helpings – Good. I’m considering a story to leave more on my plate for the first serving at restaurants.

Changes

I’m not changing anything this sprint – This is new, and I want to keep doing what I’m doing now. Plus, I don’t trust the numbers from my “Move” reading. I’m going to recalibrate to make sure it’s accurate.

Stories

As someone using agility to enable a healthy lifestyle transformation:

  1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
  2. I want to burn an extra 800 calories each day, as measured by the Watch’s “Move” measure, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
  3. I want to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest.
  4. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
  5. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license.
  6. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).

Release Six – It’ll Be Just Like Starting Over

Hi. It’s been a while.

19 months ago, I wrote my last post on this effort. I thought, incorrectly it seems, that I was “fine.” I thought I was handling the death of my father… fine. I thought I was handling receiving a double-bypass… fine. I thought I was handling a new boss, being run over by a bus (figuratively), being “the rock”, the fixer… fine.

In reality, though, I wasn’t handling any of it, and I was certainly not fine. It was only the support of family and friends that kept me from just dissolving into a puddle.

A Quick Recap


On April 10th (2017), at the Global Scrum Gathering, I attended a breakout session called Ride the Scrum Wave to Health and Wellness (or How I Used Scrum Principles to Lose 40 lbs.) by Alex Brown. Alex is a Wharton School Graduate, the former COO of Scrum, Inc., and is currently a Principal at Glaessel Ventures. He’s also a very good speaker.

Alex shared how he used Scrum principles and practices to control his weight loss. He established meaningful, manageable, and achievable goals. He developed and prioritized the behavior changes he needed to introduce into User Stories, like “As someone trying to lose weight, I want to eat my last meal of the day before 8:00pm, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.” He also instituted a short iteration period of a week, with his weigh-in the sprint review.

I’ve been a Scrum practitioner/evangelist for seven years, and I’m amazed this never occurred to me. I know that Scrum is not just for software development. At Kennedy Space Center, I coached some folks on using Scrum for Hardware, now a rapidly growing practice. I’ve even discussed using Scrum to manage our household goals with my wife, but using it for my weight… never occurred to me.

Agile Forth, Epic 1

And so I started. This effort has been evolutionary, changing as I learned more about myself and what I was doing. In the beginning, I just wanted to lose weight.

The body is a complex, dispositional system. To paraphrase Aaron Dignan in Brave New Work, complex systems are dispositional – we can only make informed guesses about what our bodies are likely to do, but we can’t be sure.

The diets I’ve tried, and I’ve tried many, treat the body like complicated system and take causal approaches, as if there’s a root cause for being fat. They say “eat this,” or “don’t eat that,” or “do this new exercise.”

Issues with complex systems aren’t identifiable through root cause analyses, and aren’t usually solvable by fixing “one thing”; they require myriad small touches.

Enter Agility

Agile and Scrum are, at their hearts, scientific approaches to getting things done. Instead of setting a BIG GOAL and doing BIG THINGS over long periods of time, you break things into small chunks, make hypotheses about what you can get done in small amounts of time, work on them, and then look at your result. Afterwards, you can change your direction – as often as you need to.

As I mentioned in Epic 1 – it never occurred to me to apply this approach to weight loss, but it makes sense, and so I tried it.

A Traditional Approach

If I were looking at my weight loss from a traditional “Big Goal” point of view, I have to perform the following:

  • I have to lose about 150 pounds
  • Whatever approach I use, it has to be something I stick with, and so I better pick right
  • I’m going to be working out for many hours per week, or else I’ll gain the weight back
  • I have to give up a whole lot of things I like

And the best part is that I don’t know what will work, why it may work, or how long it will take. Moreover, there aren’t small victories – if I don’t hit 150 pounds of loss, I’ve failed!

An Iterative and Incremental Approach

That’s not what works for me. In an agile approach, I break my effort into small increments of work. In agile, one word for these is Epics, and to make the scope of what I’m doing less scary, my Epics are only 10 pounds in size; lose 10 pounds… SUCCESS!

How long will it take to lose 10 pounds? It might be 3 weeks, it may be 6 if I hit a plateau. That makes it tough to determine if what I’m doing works. Instead of waiting until 10 pounds is gone, I’m going to work my time into small iterations, called Sprints, that are each one week long.

At the end of each week, I’ll take an honest look at my progress and performance. I then have a “retrospective”, examining what went right and what went wrong, and document that. I make adjustments, update the stories for the next week, and start over. I’ll share all of this with you.

Each week I’ll commit to what I’m going to do in that week using Stories. Each Story is written along the lines of this example: As someone using agility to enable a healthy lifestyle transformation, I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.

The beauty of this is that I’m only ever committing to a week. If something works, I might do more of it. If something doesn’t, either change it or pitch it. If I have something special coming up (like a party or a trip), I can change my stories to take that into account, instead of getting derailed.

My Derailers

As you can read elsewhere in this blog, the Summer of ’17 was a major disaster for me, with the death of my Father and my double-bypass. It took me months to physically recover from the latter, but my emotional recovery from the former took longer.

I then tried to reboot, and wasn’t ready, and so became ashamed of not doing what I said I was going to do. Between the pain and shame and, well, everything else, I needed this to be perfect.

Perfect is the Enemy

I wanted to start this over. But when? How? I kept throwing obstacles in my own way… I need… walking shoes. I need… to fix the blog. I need… to find time for this… etc. This is my form of procrastination.

I wanted it to be perfect. There are plenty of versions of quotes on “perfect being the enemy of good”, but I like this one…


(I)nstead of pushing yourself to an impossible “perfect,” and therefore getting nowhere, accept “good.” Many things worth doing are worth doing badly.

Gretchen Rubin, Huffington Post

I was pushing myself to an impossible “perfect,” and getting nowhere. Well, if I end up doing this badly, at least I’m doing it.

The biggest question in my head, reflecting on the shame of trying to restart this and failing, was “Do I show what I’ve done before?” It would have been easier, but it would have been cheating, so yes. In the spirit of full transparency, I’m NOT restarting this effort from scratch. I’ve left my previous posts out there, because I didn’t restart life, I’m just continuing.

Time to get this train rolling. All aboard!

Epic Six is set to begin, as an imperfect reboot!

  • Date: 4/7/2019
  • Weight: 359.4 lbs. (yep, put it all back on…)
  • Epic Definition of Done: 349.4 lbs.

Stories

As someone using agility to enable a healthy lifestyle transformation:

  1. I stop consuming calories at 8 PM, because my body stores unspent calories overnight as fat.
  2. I want to burn an extra 800 calories each day, as measured by the Watch’s “Move” measure, to ensure that I am getting exercise and maintaining a minimum level of activity.
  3. I want to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night, because when I don’t my body tries to substitute calories for rest.
  4. I don’t drink diet sodas, to avoid any side-effects of such, and to not try to fool my body that it’s getting extra calories.
  5. I do not drink alcohol at home, because the calories add no nutritional value to my body. For social occasions out, I give myself license.
  6. I don’t have second helpings at meals, because this adds significant calories without exploring new tastes. Even bottomless french fries (sigh).

Let the Merriment Begin!

Sprint Results

Epics